Mountain House Scrambled Eggs with Ham and Red & Green Peppers

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The Freeze Dried Mountain House Scrambled Eggs with Ham and Red & Green Peppers

The foil lined inner packaging provides a good layer of moisture protection, while the exterior is aesthetically pleasing and rather tough.

The foil lined inner packaging provides a good layer of moisture protection, while the exterior is aesthetically pleasing and rather tough.

By Jason Wagner

If you were to go back to my first post for JustInCaseReviews.com – the Mountain House scrambled eggs and bacon, you’d know that I enjoyed that one, and as a direct result I had little to no aversion in giving this one a try. For the record, I’ll review anything, but some things really do give me the chills…Yet, as always, no matter the item I keep an open mind; I’m just glad an open mind wasn’t required in this case.

Taste – 9.0/10: It tasted as advertised with the eggs tasting close to fresh and the same being true for the ham and bell peppers. In light of the really authentic tasting bell peppers, with their awesome tasting, slightly spicy and practically bursting with delicious pepper water, it would seem all the sadder that they, Mountain House didn’t provide enough of the bell peppers. Meanwhile the ham was salty, hammy, surprisingly lean and just very good– no mince-meat here, and unlike the peppers I feel that a generous portion of the ham was provided herein.

Texture – 8.8/10: The texture, ah the texture – the texture was extraordinarily pleasing. Explanation? Of course: The eggs were fluffy and right-tasting through, yet they also had a pleasing freeze dried texture all their own. Meanwhile, I found myself to be very happy with the ham and the peppers. What I appreciate about the hams texture most of all was its uniform and cubed appearance – there were no offensive or otherwise misshapen pieces of minced meat product – only lean cut-cubed pieces of nice and salty ham. The bell peppers seamed similar to their fresh cousins, albeit they were softer, but still very pleasing as far as texture goes.

Convenience – 8.1/10: Hmm… I guess the only thing I can say is that you’ve got to boil some water and then allow it to sit a few minutes, so it’s less convenient that an MRE and more convenient that something that you’d have to simmer over a stove or open flame.

 

The appearance doesn't change too much once it's cooked...fortunately, it looks appetizing in either form.

The appearance doesn’t change too much once it’s cooked…fortunately, it looks appetizing in either form.

Filling Factor – 7.8/10: The provided portion is quite decent, so the score may seem a little harsh, but don’t forget to consider that this is a breakfast food and on account of that, the serving should be at least a notch above the portion provided, the portion provided was exactly as shown in the picture. Going by the rather pathetic sum shown in the picture, I think that we can all agree that the percentage of food should have been kicked up to, I don’t know, 30%, or perhaps even more to be considered a proper serving of morning glory.

Operational Security – 8.5/10: The OpSec is virtually the same as every single other Mountain House product that I’ve ever reviewed with perhaps a slight alteration – the smell, aroma would seem to be slightly less than most of Mountain Houses other offerings, so there you’ve got it – stealthy enough.

9.0/10: Both the cans and pouches are both excellent in the category of shelf-shelf for their own reason individual reasons, but in the case of what I’m reviewing – the pouched version, the use by date is about 7 years, so not too bad at all

Weight/Bulk – 9.0/10: The pouches are the perfect lightweight and well-shaped/formed companions for the trail or perhaps more fun – the wasteland. While the canned versions make for the perfect home-based and stalwart defenders against the malignant effects of starvation.

Resource Efficiency – 7.7/10: Can you bring 8 ounces of water to a full boil? Can you spare either the fuel or water? Neither are unreasonable requests, but the less of a strain put on your resources in a time when you you can spare it the least, the better.

Hoofing-It/On-The-Move-Score: Anything that isn’t eat right out of the pouch, bag in of itself makes it a less than ideal product for hoofing it…so no, this one doesn’t impress me a grand deal. What can be considered an impeccably good part of this Mountain House freeze dried product is its slim pouch profile and their pouches tendency to be ridiculously lightweight The good and bad all combine for an acceptably proficient product as far as man-portability is concerned.

Nutritional – 9.0/10: It totally behooves me to call it like I see it – at 360 calories per bag, this doesn’t quite meet my criteria of a real breakfast. While the amount of calories are nearly laughable, the individual calories  are very much packed with the good minerals and vitamin. Most dominantly the large sums of vitamin C so you won’t be getting any of the scurvy if you’ve got this one on hand. There are also good servings of vitamin A and calcium, and lastly you’ve got your obligatory iron and protein in admirable sums.

Final Review – 8.7/10: As far as I care to concern myself apocalypse or not – everyone should be able to look forward to some fine morning food, and I don’t mean mourning food like somebody just died, I mean morning food. As a scrambled eggs with ham and bells pepper freeze dried food product, I’d say Mountain House has a good thing going on here and I wouldn’t hesitate to use this as a part of your survival food rotation and more importantly – I do believe that I can recommend this as a regular part of your emergency supplies, your emergency food supply, that is.

Here you can see what I was speaking of - the less than ideal portion size. Despite my qualms, what's there makes for excellent survival eating.

Here you can see what I was speaking of – the less than ideal portion size. Despite my qualms, what’s there makes for excellent survival eating.

Note: Make sure you stir this enough and ensure that the seal is tightly engaged otherwise you’ll wind up with some partially cooked eggs and ham; not a good thing.

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